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Kwandwe

Within easy reach of South Africa's sunny coastline, Kwandwe Private Game Reserve is an ideal malaria-free safari destination. The Reserve flanks both the north and south banks of the Great Fish River, which meanders for 30 km (19 miles) through this pristine, private wilderness where the Big Five once again roams freely. Kwandwe's vast landscape is affected by the ocean, with south-facing slopes capturing moisture f...

Kwandwe
Wall Posts

Thu 21 July 16:31

Keen to spend a couple of days at Phinda on the weekend!

Wed 13 July 10:02

4 different leopards seen in the last 3 days, and the sunny winter days are amazing!

Tue 05 July 22:55

Kwandwe is full of water and looking amazing

Latest Diary Posts

Black and White Rhino fighting...on a walk!

Viewing  animals whilst on foot is one of the most special experiences for me. Of course, the opportunity to get up close to some of Africa’s iconic creatures ... read more

Sunset Kill

It was late afternoon and we were sitting watching two male cheetah lying in one of Kwandwe’s open plains. They were the dominant coalition on Kwandwe, and the ... read more

Right Place Right Time

I was up in the mountains in the north of Kwandwe  trying to unravel the mysteries of some lion tracks from the previous night. The tracks went up and down the road ... read more

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Scratching Solifuge

About Kwandwe

Within easy reach of South Africa's sunny coastline, Kwandwe Private Game Reserve is an ideal malaria-free safari destination. The Reserve flanks both the north and south banks of the Great Fish River, which meanders for 30 km (19 miles) through this pristine, private wilderness where the Big Five once again roams freely. Kwandwe's vast landscape is affected by the ocean, with south-facing slopes capturing moisture from the sea breezes resulting in denser or taller vegetation and brightly coloured lichens. In contrast, the north-facing slopes tend to be drier and more open and feature striking aloes, which flower in spectacular profusion during the winter months (June to August). Forest-like thickets of tree euphorbia grow on the steep, south-facing slopes. These spiny plants are immune to destruction from most animal species (except the black rhino) thanks to the poisonous milky latex they exude. The wide open spaces and tranquil scenery belie the area's turbulent history, and relics of the area's rich historical and cultural legacy can be found both on the reserve and nearby. Explore this enchanting wilderness either on an open game drive vehicle or on foot and experience Africa’s wildlife with a uniquely personal touch while accompanied by some of the finest guides in the business.